John Minnich https://www.johnjminnich.com Executive Coach + Keynote Speaker + Leadership Trainer + Management Consultant Wed, 02 Sep 2020 12:18:16 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.5.1 https://www.johnjminnich.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/John-Minnich-500x500-Cropped-50x50-1.jpg John Minnich https://www.johnjminnich.com 32 32 179979924 Leadership Goes Beyond the Job Title https://www.johnjminnich.com/2020/05/27/leadership-goes-beyond-the-job-title/ https://www.johnjminnich.com/2020/05/27/leadership-goes-beyond-the-job-title/#respond Wed, 27 May 2020 12:00:42 +0000 https://www.johnjminnich.com/?p=22486 This fall, I will facilitate an executive leadership program through Purdue University Fort Wayne’s Office of Continuing Studies. The noncredit program is designed for senior managers motivated to take their careers to the next level. Participants will be guided through a series of 12 sections in 3 tracks focusing on business insight, innovation, and organizational […]

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This fall, I will facilitate an executive leadership program through Purdue University Fort Wayne’s Office of Continuing Studies. The noncredit program is designed for senior managers motivated to take their careers to the next level. Participants will be guided through a series of 12 sections in 3 tracks focusing on business insight, innovation, and organizational leadership.

Countless resources exist on leadership. Our conversation, yes, I look forward to your insight, embodies some of what I perceive and value as great leadership as portrayed by business and community leaders. For many, our discussion serves as a refresher and opportunity for you to reflect on your opinion of a great leader. As I attempt to articulate some of what I value, I welcome your expertise so that we can all continue to grow and learn. For those early in your respective profession, I hope this fosters some ideas applicable to your journey. If you aspire upward movement at your organization, keep in mind the importance of developing and applying soft skills.

Leadership exists in many forms. A leader can have positional authority. However, positional authority does not necessarily equate to leadership. Leadership transcends position. One must know when to lead and when to follow. A direct report or team member can and will weave in and out of lead and follow modes.

Let me kick off our discussion:

Qualities of Great Leaders

  • Great leaders have integrity and conduct themselves in a professional manner. With a moral compass, they serve as good stewards.
  • They lead by example setting a proper tone for their organization and community through actions.
  • Great leaders have strong communication skills both written and oral. They realize the importance of nonverbal and verbal delivery. They articulate vision. Simon Sinek offers his perspective on “How Great Leaders Inspire Action.”
  • Great leaders persuade. Building community and consensus, they seek to convince others rather than coerce compliance. Inspirational, they motivate.
  • Through active listening, great leaders know the pulse of their organization. They seek to listen receptively including to the unspoken.
  • Great leaders reflect and have self-awareness. With an inquisitive mind, they ask good questions and constantly learn. Resilient, great leaders seek continuous improvement and learn from failures.
  • Leveraging the qualities of conceptualization, foresight, and intuition, they invest in understanding the organizational culture including historical lessons and current realities. They align operation with strategic goals and desired outcomes.
  • With credibility and through innovation, leaders serve as change agents. I encourage you to consider David Kelley’s, founder of the Silicon Valley global design firm IDEO, approach.
  • Genuine and real, great leaders lead authentically and manage conflict well through emotional intelligence and empathy.
  • Aware of internal and external forces, great leaders see the big picture. They leverage their networks. They know when to defer to the expertise of their team yet act decisively when appropriate.

Great leaders know how to build collaborative teams. As Dr. Kate Walsh, Associate Professor of Management in the School of Hotel Administration at Cornell University explains, this involves diagnosing, managing, growing, and letting go of your team. This necessitates trust, building relationships, and empowering members to own the process and desired outcomes. Great leaders create synergy and foster engagement while harnessing the energy and talents of members. They know how to lead meetings effectively and efficiently while maintaining a good balance of process and desired outcomes. Great leaders recognize behavior and preferred communication patterns. They also ethically support their team. This necessitates responsibility and mutual respect.

They commit to the growth of people. They learn how to establish direction, align people, and motivate and inspire. Dr. Bradford S. Bell, Associate Professor of Human Resource Studies and Director of Executive Education in the School of Industrial and Labor Relations at Cornell University, recommends a series of “Getting Results through Talent Management” steps.

  1. Examine Your Talent Philosophy
  2. Identify Your Key Talent
  3. Devise Development Strategies for Engagement and Retention
  4. Measure the Effectiveness

Great leaders invest in their organization’s most important asset: People. Successful organizations improve results through talent management. Great leaders serve as coaches and mentors. They show a vested interest in and develop direct reports (i.e., one-on-one sessions).

As I shared several qualities, what do you look for in a leader and how do you define?

Do you know your leadership style? Does it change based on the situation?

Several leadership styles exist:

  • Autocratic
  • Bureaucratic
  • Charismatic
  • Democratic
  • Laissez-faire
  • Servant
  • Transactional
  • Transformational

“The greatest contribution of a leader is to make other leaders.” – Simon Sinek

For growth, step outside of your comfort zone.

 

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Leading through the Lens of Data Analytics https://www.johnjminnich.com/2020/05/13/leading-through-the-lens-of-data-analytics/ https://www.johnjminnich.com/2020/05/13/leading-through-the-lens-of-data-analytics/#respond Wed, 13 May 2020 12:00:27 +0000 https://www.johnjminnich.com/?p=22478 Accounting is a practice of helping business leaders make informed business decisions. As quoted in a Business Insider article, “The CFO of the future will need to be the connector between the business and data scientists.” Peter Sondergaard, Gartner: “Data is the new oil, and analytics is the combustion engine.” For several years, the profession […]

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Accounting is a practice of helping business leaders make informed business decisions. As quoted in a Business Insider article, “The CFO of the future will need to be the connector between the business and data scientists.” Peter Sondergaard, Gartner: “Data is the new oil, and analytics is the combustion engine.”

For several years, the profession has discussed Big Data. Businesses often ask, “What is it?” “Can it really help me?” “Is data and its interpretation only for large corporations?”

In finance, we stay attuned with both financial and nonfinancial information. Data is everywhere. We truly live in an era of the Internet of Things. This data can be turned into a wealth of information. Consider your digital marketing efforts. What if you could turn clicks and shares into revenue? Could a study of store customer foot traffic help identify staffing (a cost) and/or product placement?

Data scientists study unstructured data (i.e., email, reports, text documents, images) and structured (CRM and ERP systems, inventory, transaction information). As CFOs and financial leaders, we need to understand how such expertise can improve our business.

The big data process is a system of collecting, organizing, and analyzing data. Data is turned into information. Objective evidence and information helps leaders make informed business decisions. “A picture is worth a thousand words.” When presenting data to key stakeholders, consider how you present the material. What “pictures” do you provide? Dashboards, charts, infographics?

Analytics falls into 4 categories.

Descriptive Analytics involves traditional, historical information. Examples: Employee evaluations can be used to predict turnover. Current product reviews can be used to predict future sales.

Diagnostic Analytics describes the reason for historical results. “Why did this happen?” Examples: Variance analysis comparing budget-to-actual results. Causal analysis which describes why certain results occurred. The use of analytic dashboards describing why.

Predictive Analytics analyzes historical data and trends in an attempt to determine what will happen. Examples: Preparing a cash flow projection report or what-if scenarios when forecasting.

Prescriptive Analytics focuses on finding the best course of action given available data. It represents the final step.

To position oneself as a business partner, financial leaders need to bring this lens to the table.

“From the dawn of civilization until 2003, humankind generated five exabytes of data. Now we produce five exabytes every two days…and the pace is accelerating.”
Eric Schmidt,
Executive Chairman, Google

 

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Strategic Vertical Alignment https://www.johnjminnich.com/2020/04/29/strategic-vertical-alignment/ https://www.johnjminnich.com/2020/04/29/strategic-vertical-alignment/#respond Wed, 29 Apr 2020 12:00:21 +0000 https://www.johnjminnich.com/?p=22031 What steps do you and your organization take to align vertically? A strategy pyramid is a visual tool to help guide your organization execute its plans. Elements include: Mission – Why We Exist Values – What’s Important to Us Vision – What We Want to Be Strategy – Our Game Plan Strategy Map – Translate […]

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What steps do you and your organization take to align vertically?

A strategy pyramid is a visual tool to help guide your organization execute its plans. Elements include:

  • Mission – Why We Exist
  • Values – What’s Important to Us
  • Vision – What We Want to Be
  • Strategy – Our Game Plan
  • Strategy Map – Translate the Strategy
  • Balanced Scorecard – Measure and Focus
  • Targets and Initiatives – What We Need to Do

Vertical alignment within any organization is essential. Business unit objectives at the department level should vertically integrate and align with organization-wide goals.

As teams collaborate through cross-pollination of thought and execution, the financial arm plays an ever-increasing role given its unique lens. This is where financial professionals can position themselves as a value-add. As one ascends into higher levels of management and leadership roles, a shift occurs in competency requirements. A controller, for instance, can transition into a CFO and business partner by developing and polishing leadership and broader business skills.

The following are categorized business competencies that professionals can leverage to position themselves as a value-add for their organization. Again, the emphasis and requirements for each category changes depending on role. A healthy and balanced blend of the competency areas enables a win-win for teams with the desired outcome of vertical alignment.

Technical skills are fundamental to every profession, especially financial. Finance professionals are experts in recording, processing, and analyzing financial information to share with various stakeholders, both internal and external.

Leadership skills transcend position. It’s important to recognize when to follow and when to lead, whether peer-to-peer or strategic leadership.

Business skills should be understood by all finance professionals. Every transaction flows through the finance department. Financial professionals can leverage their knowledge of the business environment as they transform data into information and insight. A deeper understanding of various business functions enables companies to align department-level objectives and outcomes with organization-wide mission and strategies. This leads to improved performance and better positioning the business for the future.

People skills include one’s ability to collaborate, influence decisions, communicate and present both written and orally.

Digital/technology skills are ever-changing. Business and finance professionals should remain relevant, agile, and adaptable to keep pace with technology advancements. Digital skills, liken to leadership, permeates all knowledge and functional areas.

The right leadership, blend of competency at various levels, and to quote Jim Collins, “the right people on the bus, the right people in the right seats” positions organizations to align vertically.

What steps do you and your organization take to align vertically?

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Strategic Tools for Management https://www.johnjminnich.com/2019/09/25/strategic-tools-for-management/ https://www.johnjminnich.com/2019/09/25/strategic-tools-for-management/#respond Wed, 25 Sep 2019 12:04:10 +0000 https://www.johnjminnich.com/?p=11756 To make informed business decisions, a couple of my favorite tools available to management are segmented reporting and the balanced scorecard. A segment is any part or activity of an organization about which a manager seeks cost, revenue, or profit data. This can be represented by a location or business unit at the division or […]

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To make informed business decisions, a couple of my favorite tools available to management are segmented reporting and the balanced scorecard. A segment is any part or activity of an organization about which a manager seeks cost, revenue, or profit data. This can be represented by a location or business unit at the division or department level. The balanced scorecard concept is a performance management tool tracking the financial measures of an organization and key non-financial measures relating to customers or clients, internal processes, and organizational learning and growth. The “scorecard” can be used to monitor performance. Successful organizations review the balanced score on a recurring (i.e., quarterly) basis.

Business segment reporting breaks out an organization’s financial data whether divisions, subsidiaries, or other business segments. For upper management, business segment reporting is used to evaluate each segment’s income, expenses, assets, liabilities, etc. to gauge performance, profitability, and risk. Reported to shareholders via an annual report, segmented reporting provides a picture of a public company’s performance.

A flexible strategic management tool, for profit and nonprofit organizations can adapt and adopt the balanced scorecard implementing their own variation to meet their strategic purposes. Reported in quartiles, the strategic process helps identify important links between financial performance and the underlying customer, internal process, and organizational metrics. With this approach, executive management can articulate and translate strategic vision into actionable steps to drive performance and success. At its core is strategy. Implemented properly, it goes beyond the singular focus of the annual budget. The process aligns measures, actions, and rewards to execute strategic initiatives and the achievement of strategic objectives. As you can see, the scorecard provides an important lens to relevant stakeholder, internal process and operations, and resource measures.

As with the budget process, successful organizations treat strategy as a living and breathing process. Segmented reporting paints additional pictures for management enabling them to drill down into areas. The balance scorecard process captures the entire story of for profit and nonprofit organizations. Combining financial and nonfinancial drivers provide a more complete picture of business operations. Both strategic management tools provide useful information to articulate vision and drive performance and outcomes. If you are solely focused on the budget process, you should consider implementing these effective resources.

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Professional Membership Associations https://www.johnjminnich.com/2019/09/23/professional-membership-associations/ https://www.johnjminnich.com/2019/09/23/professional-membership-associations/#respond Mon, 23 Sep 2019 13:06:52 +0000 https://www.johnjminnich.com/?p=11700 Frequently, I am asked about my experiences as colleagues explore their own paths. Just this past week, I met with an individual considering two avenues: (1) Business and (2) university. They generally ask which one that I prefer. I smile and respond, “Both!” As business faculty, I enjoy opportunities to serve on boards and to […]

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Frequently, I am asked about my experiences as colleagues explore their own paths. Just this past week, I met with an individual considering two avenues: (1) Business and (2) university. They generally ask which one that I prefer. I smile and respond, “Both!” As business faculty, I enjoy opportunities to serve on boards and to maintain a book of clients. In business whether as a professional service provider engaging with clients or working internally with customers/clients at one organization, I facilitate adjunct.

Regardless of the role, I continue to have two common denominators: (1) Business and (2) professional membership associations.

Recently, I attended development sessions through professional membership associations that I currently support including Financial Executives International and Indiana CPA Society in addition to engaging with Northeast Indiana HR Association. The connections made from around the country and in our region are priceless. If you are a member of an association and have yet to engage, I strongly encourage you to get involved. We can leverage your talents. From a lens of long-term continuity, many associations are looking at and filling their pipeline of emerging leaders. You benefit from increasing experiences and opportunities. From high-performance leadership, operations, knowledge management, emotional intelligence, leadership versus management, emerging technologies, innovation, critical thinking, soft and technical skills, coaching, employee engagement, etc., the opportunities to grow seem endless. You learn a LOT! Your career accelerates exponentially. Come join us! We can use your help.

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Business is, Well, Business https://www.johnjminnich.com/2019/09/09/business-is-well-business/ https://www.johnjminnich.com/2019/09/09/business-is-well-business/#respond Mon, 09 Sep 2019 13:35:32 +0000 https://www.johnjminnich.com/?p=11369 Not exactly groundbreaking material: Business is, well, business. Whether for profit or nonprofit, every organization in the world has customers, vendors, etc. It is a common thread across the sectors of our economy. Sure, with manufacturing, we look at cost concepts such as direct materials, direct labor, and manufacturing overhead. Finished goods and work in […]

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Not exactly groundbreaking material: Business is, well, business. Whether for profit or nonprofit, every organization in the world has customers, vendors, etc. It is a common thread across the sectors of our economy. Sure, with manufacturing, we look at cost concepts such as direct materials, direct labor, and manufacturing overhead. Finished goods and work in process. With nonprofits, we look at fundraising dollars and program costs. Regardless, decisions involve choosing between alternatives. The goal of making decisions is to identify those costs that are either relevant or irrelevant to the decision.

When it comes to accounting, there are two areas: (1) Financial accounting and (2) managerial accounting. Financial accounting is concerned with reporting financial information to external parties, such as stockholders, creditors, and regulators. Managerial accounting, on the other hand, is concerned with providing information to managers within an organization so that they can formulate plans, control operations, and make informed business decisions.

What sets a business apart is its value proposition. Have you considered what the value chain looks like at your business? A value chain is simply a set of activities that an organization carries out to create value for its customers. At its core and overlapping is the role the financial arm of your organization helping the other units make informed business decisions. The finance arm is critical to the long-term health and sustainability of every organization. Your financial “house” needs to be in order.

During my career, I have engaged in both financial and managerial capacities with for profit and nonprofit organizations. From budget and fiscal responsibilities to financial auditor to engaging with manufacturing and distribution clients with their inventory cycle counts to helping healthcare, professional services, and retail businesses, I enjoy all aspects of the financial function. There is just something about designing reports and providing information to help organizations with their financial decisions from inventory levels to the impact of programs. To hear the excitement of a client share that a newly created report now ran in a matter of minutes has saved her two days from a former, cumbersome manual process is rewarding. What I have found is organizations that (1) have their financial “house” in order and (2) identify and execute on their value proposition succeed. What value-add are you providing?

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Strategic Business and Financial Management https://www.johnjminnich.com/2019/08/19/strategic-business-and-financial-management/ https://www.johnjminnich.com/2019/08/19/strategic-business-and-financial-management/#respond Mon, 19 Aug 2019 18:50:42 +0000 https://www.johnjminnich.com/?p=10870 This year, I was invited to serve Purdue University Fort Wayne. What a fantastic opportunity to facilitate discussions with colleagues and help develop current and emerging business leaders. I have 50 MBA students enrolled in two sections of strategic cost management this fall. We will emphasize strategic planning and thinking as we continue to build […]

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This year, I was invited to serve Purdue University Fort Wayne. What a fantastic opportunity to facilitate discussions with colleagues and help develop current and emerging business leaders. I have 50 MBA students enrolled in two sections of strategic cost management this fall. We will emphasize strategic planning and thinking as we continue to build upon a solid foundation of business and financial management.

As an alum of Dulin, Ward & DeWald; DWD Technology Group; Katz, Sapper & Miller (Indianapolis); Baden, Gage & Schroeder (intern); and Parkview Health (corporate office), I look forward to a breadth of for profit and nonprofit conversations with our students. And still engaged with clients as a practitioner assisting organizations with executive, business, financial, knowledge/information management, and data analytics needs, I hope these continued engagements will provide additional lenses for students.

Over the course of the semester, students will learn about and develop skills in:

  • Strategy
  • Sound financial management
  • Tools such as the balanced scorecard and SWOT analysis
  • KPIs and performance measures
  • Data analytics
  • Information systems
  • CFO versus controller
  • Changing role of financial executives and their role as a member of executive leadership teams
  • Communication
  • Purchase versus buy decisions
  • Capital budgeting
  • Budget planning and action
  • Collaboration
  • Leadership and management

Many of our conversations will center around what students are experiencing and seeing with the organizations that they serve in addition to theoretical studies. We will leverage resources available through the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, Chartered Global Management Accountant, Financial Executives International, and Indiana CPA Society. As financial executives and managers have increasing roles supporting direct reports, we will also discuss human resources (NIHRA) and risk management.

Check back often and feel free to subscribe to our newsletter! We will continue to share knowledge with the business and nonprofit community.

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Information Systems and Data Analytics https://www.johnjminnich.com/2019/08/06/information-systems-and-data-analytics/ https://www.johnjminnich.com/2019/08/06/information-systems-and-data-analytics/#respond Tue, 06 Aug 2019 14:52:28 +0000 https://www.johnjminnich.com/?p=9575 With interests in business and technology, one of my favorite courses in college was accounting information systems. I was drawn to the overlapping content areas (i.e., business, computer science) emphasizing both big picture and detail. I grew up at the cusp of analog and digital as my parents purchased our first computer when I was […]

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With interests in business and technology, one of my favorite courses in college was accounting information systems. I was drawn to the overlapping content areas (i.e., business, computer science) emphasizing both big picture and detail. I grew up at the cusp of analog and digital as my parents purchased our first computer when I was in high school. My brother and I would tear apart out of curiosity and to upgrade.

During my junior year, I took a course requiring us to record transactions and complete business documents manually (i.e., bills of lading, purchase, orders, invoices) on columnar, green bar and carbon copy paper during the first half of the semester. For the second half, we were charged with creating an electronic system to record and present results. Assembled into teams, I led our group in a new direction. We were the first to build an Access database rather than use Excel. ODBC relationships just seemed to make more sense.

While exploring various universities to pursue graduate and undergraduate degrees, I had visited West Lafayette having completed a collegiate connection (dual credit) course through Purdue Fort Wayne (formerly IPFW). Only fitting that I have the opportunity to serve the university in Fort Wayne 22 years later as faculty having practiced as an accounting systems consultant for 8 years.

Accounting information systems embodies the interconnectedness of accounting, auditing, computer science, management information systems, and other business disciplines including marketing. It is the framework empowering business leaders and owners to make informed decisions. Both a language and quantitative, it tells a story. The interpretation and presentation of data analytics paints a picture.

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CFO https://www.johnjminnich.com/2019/02/18/cfo/ https://www.johnjminnich.com/2019/02/18/cfo/#respond Mon, 18 Feb 2019 09:00:57 +0000 https://www.johnjminnich.com/?p=3047 The post CFO appeared first on John Minnich.

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As a profession, we continuously strive to offer value-added services for our clients and customers. Innovative and entrepreneurial minds identify opportunities to provide services and solutions needed in the community. Visionary service providers recognize the shift in the market toward CFO consulting practices as a value add.

At the cusp of an unprecedented generational and institutional knowledge shift in the workforce, organizations need a business partner that they can trust and one that has relevant experience to their needs. With multiple years in public accounting and as a CFO, I can attest that the roles and experiences are very different. In addition to financial analysis, the latter involves supporting a team generally comprised of administrative functions including accounting, human resources, and technology.

The responsibilities of a CFO involve maintaining professional relations, financial oversight, process improvement, strategic planning, KPI dashboards, forecasting, cash flows, and team compensation planning. Being a CFO means engaging with operations and playing a pivotal position in helping lead and run a business. It means walking in the shoes of a business owner. You truly live the ebb and flow of its ups and downs and must know its pulse. You see operations through various lenses.

Our economy will continue to experience an increasing gap as colleagues continue to retire. What are you doing today? With the demands of daily operational needs, many companies forgo intermediate and long-term planning. Has your organization assembled a succession plan for its business operations or financial team? Many organizations recognize the need for and fill the critical role of controller. Quite often, many businesses misinterpret the CFO and controller positions, very complementary roles that must engage in tandem.

For those whom might have an interest in serving as CFO someday, it is important to understand how the responsibilities overlap yet differ from the controller. The role of the CFO continues to evolve from having financial acumen to complementing it with business operations, strategic planning, and innovation. A thirst for knowledge along with having respect for your teammates makes the journey rewarding. This starts with having an understanding of and appreciation for positions. It is all part of that expanded role in business that CPAs must embrace, which is addressed in the INCPAS 2025 document.

Controllers, serving a management function, have the responsibility for accounting and record keeping of an organization from a historical perspective. They ensure that established policies are followed and are responsible for financial and regulatory compliance. Depending on the size of the organization, additional duties can include coordination of audits, human resources, insurance, management of information technology, and tax reporting including federal income and sales.

CFOs similarly have financial responsibility yet have a more encompassing function. Using a forward-looking and big-picture approach, they review financial statements to gain perspectives on past performance. CFOs analyze information and work closely with operations and management to develop and implement strategy for the organization to achieve its goals. They serve as stewards, play a key role in operations, help influence the future direction of the company as business leaders and strategists, and act as catalysts driving process improvements and innovations that add value to the company.

A CFO can no longer rely on number crunching and spreadsheets alone as the demands rapidly change. According to an article from Business Insider, CFOs must possess these nine skills:

  1. CFOs must become analytics wizards.
  2. CFOs must manage an increasing amount of risk.
  3. CFOs must adapt to new technology.
  4. CFOs must become better at managing people.
  5. The CFO of the future must guide decisions in a politically charged atmosphere.
  6. CFOs must manage big data as a large part of business operations.
  7. CFOs will make effective decisions with analytics from outside of the enterprise.
  8. CFOs need to understand business drivers and the underlying non-financial information that drives the financials of their company.
  9. Hiring decisions will become a major part of the job for future CFOs. They will need to drive talent acquisition and retention.

In a recent Forbes article, “Three Ways to be a More Strategic CFO,” a discussion centers around what it takes to succeed as a CFO today. Three takeaways:

  1. CFOs must have a passion for and deep understanding of the organization along with intellectual curiosity.
  2. CFOs should have the attitude and aptitude to properly balance risk and reward.
  3. CFOs should be visible working in teams as business partners.

I thoroughly enjoy opportunities to engage with businesses and operations and absolutely relish collaborating with colleagues whom have expertise in each of their areas. For aspiring CFOs, I hope this helps paint a picture for you. I always value teammates with whom I serve. Everyone brings a unique and diverse skill set to each team as they play their positions. Professional service providers or businesses, give me a call. I look forward to identifying ways to partner with and continue helping businesses and our community thrive. In May, a few members from our Financial Executives International-Fort Wayne Chapter leadership team will attend the national Financial Leadership Summit. Having chosen courses to attend, the agenda looks amazing! With over 500 anticipated attendees, I look forward to a time of reflection, professional development, connecting with new colleagues from across the nation, and the opportunity to bring ideas back to our Chapter and Midwest businesses.

In addition to my passion for business operations and financial oversight, one of my favorite parts of my career is the opportunity to network. I always welcome opportunities to connect one-on-one with colleagues. Regardless of your role in business or the community, I look forward to engaging. Just let me know what works best for your schedule. I assure you, we all can learn from each other. In fact, I will be facilitating a couple of courses in Fort Wayne and on the campus of Notre Dame in South Bend this year regarding the above topics and ethics. Register here. Let me know if you plan on attending!

Another controller versus CFO perspective at Inc.

John Minnich, CPA, CGMA, CFRM, MAcct
Business + Financial + Relations
CFO

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Celebrating Community https://www.johnjminnich.com/2017/02/24/470/ https://www.johnjminnich.com/2017/02/24/470/#respond Fri, 24 Feb 2017 08:00:00 +0000 https://www.johnjminnich.com/2017/02/24/470/ The post Celebrating Community appeared first on John Minnich.

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Born and raised in Fort Wayne, I am thrilled to see the momentum of our strong, growing and vibrant community. Our leaders have shared and continue to collaborate on a vision that will benefit generations well into the future. They actively participate and give back through nonprofit involvement. We have thousands of nonprofit organizations in our area that benefit from such generosity.

When I hear about what our students are doing in our community as they model area leaders, I get excited and feel proud to be a member of the Concordia community. In October, more than 700 students volunteered during our annual service day event. In December, students and staff exemplified servant leadership through their dedication of time, talents and treasures by adopting 32 Christmas Bureau families and reaching 144 people.

In the Greater Fort Wayne area, plenty of opportunities exist to get involved. Community leaders have set the tone, and many of our Concordia students continue to model exceptional behavior. Our students will one day be at the helm as they assume leadership roles. I firmly believe that giving back without expecting anything in return is one of the core values of being a leader and a professional.

Kudos Concordia students for cultivating these traits at a young age!

John Minnich, 
Chief Financial Officer

*This blog was written for, and first published by, Concordia Lutheran High School.

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